Dyson Supersonic – why so successful?

The Dyson Supersonic has been mentioned in the John Lewis Retail Report. I’m tempted to say that being name checked alongside flamingos and avocados is an achievement in itself, but perhaps more importantly, the Supersonic was listed as the retail giant’s largest selling hairdryer in 2016 – even with its £299 price tag.

The Dyson Supersonic has been mentioned in the John Lewis Retail Report. I’m tempted to say that being name checked alongside flamingos and avocados is an achievement in itself, but perhaps more importantly, the Supersonic was listed as the retail giant’s largest selling hairdryer in 2016 – even with its £299 price tag.

At Mash we’ve enjoyed some Supersonic glory too. As Dyson’s staffing partner, we provided 65 hair & beauty specialists to introduce shoppers to the new product in John Lewis and House of Fraser stores. Both the COGS Awards and the FMBEs recognised the role Mash played in Dyson Supersonic success, and presented us with Gold and Silver Awards respectively.

But why has one of the most expensive hairdryers on the market proved so popular?

The answer is value for money. But what exactly does that mean? And what can other brands learn from the Dyson Supersonic experience?

There is no doubt that the Supersonic is jam-packed with brilliant technology that improves the hair drying experience in a host of different ways. It’s easier to hold, quicker to dry and its superior temperature control means the hair looks better when it’s dry.

But it’s also about 30 times more expensive than the cheapest hairdryer on the market. When does value for money mean spending so much more?

It’s a good question to ask in the aftermath of the Apple iPhone X launch. Sure, their new flagship phone has got stand out features – but is it worth the few extra hundred pounds? Exactly what value does an all-screen phone actually bring? (Especially when Samsung has been doing it for years.)

This is not a question we need to ask Dyson.

Like Apple, they have a team of amazing designers taking bold steps in innovation. But before that process begins, they consider basic human need. And real need almost always has its roots in the humdrum i.e. no one enjoys vacuuming the carpet but (almost) everyone feels that they need a clean house.

Washing your hair is rarely fun, but is essential if you want a role in polite society. And with washing comes drying. While the exercise is a time-consuming nuisance, having beautifully managed locks is essential for many people. Add in the frequency of using a hairdryer three, four, five times a week, and spending £299 on a radically better experience can suddenly feel like loose change.

So to summarise: humans create the need, Dyson creates the product, and Mash staff create the connection. What a (award) winning team!

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