Lavazza Activation Campaign

Sponsorship Activation on the Queue T

As Andy Murray wakes up after a champagne-fuelled Wimbledon Ball, no doubt wishing he hadn’t promised to “really enjoy it this time”, marketers will start to reflect on the brand successes of this preeminent sporting event.

As Andy Murray wakes up after a champagne-fuelled Wimbledon Ball, no doubt wishing he hadn’t promised to “really enjoy it this time”, marketers will start to reflect on the brand successes of this preeminent sporting event.

Ah Wimbledon. Strawberries and cream. Panama hats and floral displays. Sue Barker, Prince William and David Beckham in a suit. Iconic British traditions delivered with the grace and aplomb of an institution steeped in the discreet recognition of its principal status in the world – an institution reluctant to be marred by the grubby landscape of brand sponsorship.

But is that really the case? Or is Wimbledon cleverly protecting its core brand values while it modernises on the quiet? In one area particularly, Wimbledon is offering more opportunities for consumer engagement than ever before – although it seems it is their more recent suppliers that are making the most of this new opportunity.

Slazenger has been the official ball supplier to the Championships since 1902, but it was HSBC (banking partner for a mere 9 years) who invited queuing fans to try a spot of tennis on their mini court. And very popular it proved too – with a few young tennis enthusiasts certainly putting our Mashers through their paces.

Official soft drinks supplier since 1935, Robinsons was practically invented on the courts of Wimbledon – and the brand runs a multi-faceted marketing campaign during the tournament. But Robinson’s queue activation was a simple sampling exercise while Lavazza (coffee supplier since 2011) provided a premium café area and offered fans a free coffee plus the chance to have their photo imprinted in the froth.

Experiential professionals everywhere understand the challenges and opportunities for brand engagement presented by ‘the queue’. The highly organised nature of the Wimbledon queue ensures it is both a positive experience, and a predictable one in terms of numbers and times – absolute gold dust to a brand experience designer.
So as Lavazza and HSBC report on the success of their respective activations, I foresee a growth in the number of supplier brands wanting to share this space.

Now where did I put Slazenger’s phone number…

Share this

Posted by

MASH Staffing